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7/2/2019
Managing an Infectious Disease Outbreak on a College Campus

2017 GLACUHO Book Club: Originals: How Non-conform
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Chapter 3 Question 2 1 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University I have experienced all four options (exit, voice, persistence, and neglect) in my personal and professional life. I agree with the author that the only choices providing improvement are voice and exit. Much like being innovative, taking that first leap in both voice and exit are the hardest, but once you do, a clear path becomes available to you.
by D. Schraeder, University of Illinois Springfield
Friday, July 28, 2017
Chapter 2 Question 1 1 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University In my first professional role, my approach to changing the nickname ascribed to the community I over saw was a false negative: I was expected to fail but ultimately flourished. In attempting to grow a community council for an apartment community, I experienced a false positive: I thought I had all the pieces for success, but ultimately didn't attract the group I desired to take part in the council. Feedback and drive were two of the strategies that I either used or could have used better. I was driven, despite the naysayers, to change the moniker. While I was driven to grow a council, I didn't have the requisite feedback from stakeholders to ensure my success.
by D. Schraeder, University of Illinois Springfield
Friday, July 28, 2017
Chapter 1 Question 2 1 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University For me, this concept goes hand in hand with the procrastination concept Grant shares later - I am thinking about something familiar (currently programming models) but see it with a fresh perspective given the time, space, and pressure of an impending deadline!
by D. Schraeder, University of Illinois Springfield
Friday, July 28, 2017
Chapter 4 Question 1 1 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University I had never really thought of this concept, but having looked at it, I can get on board (although like others apparently) begrudgingly :)
by D. Schraeder, University of Illinois Springfield
Friday, July 28, 2017
Chapter 4 Question 2 2 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University I think in Higher Education we are often challenged to be conceptual innovators - to show the end product and move forward to it. Moving towards an experimental innovation model would free us up to thinker and change ideas along the way. Too often, I think we get to the end and say the whole thing did or didn't work and are either comfortable with the end result enough to move on or throw the whole initiative out.
by D. Schraeder, University of Illinois Springfield
Friday, July 28, 2017
Final Discussion Slideshow 1 D. Schraeder, University of Illinois Springfield While Aaron and I were the only two able to attend today's discussion, we hope that should you choose to read this book as a staff or should you desire to have additional conversations with others (including in different industries) this PowerPoint will assist you in continuing those conversations.
by D. Schraeder, University of Illinois Springfield
Friday, July 28, 2017
Chapter 8 Question 2 1 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University I worked at a place in which facilities issues were not routinely or proactively addressed. When one student reported finding a candy bar wrapper behind their dresser on move in day (in a unit we said had been cleaned), our staff was mobilized to be more attentive to the cleanliness issues within the facility and ensure that we weren't just wiping down what we could see in plain sight but were prepared for students to rearrange their space and make it their own.
by D. Schraeder, University of Illinois Springfield
Friday, July 28, 2017
Chapter 8 Question 1 1 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University As a very strong introvert, I intrinsically practiced this. It is nice to have a theory to back it up ;)
by D. Schraeder, University of Illinois Springfield
Friday, July 28, 2017
Chapter 7 Question 2 1 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University In my current office, I feel pretty comfortable challenging my peers. I think our best ideas have come about when we've shared ideas and made suggestions to one another to make them better, so I agree with Grant's viewpoint here. I think within many offices I've worked in challenging peers has been relatively accepted and appreciated. Challenging those above or below me have not always been as acceptable. In these environments, the status quo (even when originally was requested) was ultimately preferred.
by D. Schraeder, University of Illinois Springfield
Friday, July 28, 2017
Chapter 7 Question 1 1 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University As I think of each of the four departments I've worked for over the years in Residence Life, I think they all started out by hiring around the professional blueprint but incorporated aspects of the star blueprint (especially once the specific skills were met) and the commitment blueprint (matching people's values to the organization's). I most enjoyed working in environments in which the star blueprint was predominant. Does that make me an original?
by D. Schraeder, University of Illinois Springfield
Friday, July 28, 2017
Chapter 3 Question 1 2 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University Agent Medina was missing a "spear-carrier" early in her attempts with Intellipedia. Lee Bolman and Terrance Deal describe spear-carriers as people with influence who can help make change. Eventually, she gained more influence and she became her own spear-carrier later in her career and got Intellipedia implemented. I believe Grant under-described her challenge with being a woman and trying to do something creative with technology, which is not a field in which there are many known women innovators.
by K. Shelton, Northern Illinois University
Wednesday, July 26, 2017
Chapter 5 Question 2 2 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University That question seems like a blending of invention (creating something new) and innovation (taking something that already exists and improving on it).
by K. Shelton, Northern Illinois University
Wednesday, July 26, 2017
Chapter 6 Question 2 1 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University As we revise our Community Handbook, which includes all the policies for living on campus, this reminds me that simply writing the rule may not drive compliance. Rather, including the why (specifically where this impacts someone else), is increasingly important.
by D. Schraeder, University of Illinois Springfield
Wednesday, July 26, 2017
Chapter 6 Question 1 1 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University I'm the oldest. My sister is 5 years younger than I and often emulated/competed at the things I enjoyed - so, I'm not sure 7 years apart is the magic number. However, as the oldest, I am much more risk adverse than either of my siblings.
by D. Schraeder, University of Illinois Springfield
Wednesday, July 26, 2017
Chapter 5 Question 1 0 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University Describe a time in which you were opposed to an idea or belief, had a change of heart, and served as an advocate for the change.  What was the situation and what led to the change?
by A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University
Wednesday, July 19, 2017
Chapter 2 Question 2 2 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University Both Segway and Ford built new products that people did not necessarily think they wanted and they certainly did not need them. Their products needed more testing because if people encountered too many problems with them, they would not sell well at all. Ford believed that his target market wanted better horses, and did not want automobiles. That takes a different strategy than something like the newest Apple iPhone, where people stand in line outside the stores in the middle of the night before new releases. Ford's products had to be excellent, otherwise, people really would not want them at all.In the residence halls, many students really do not want them. They want apartments. Our school has a first-year residency program, so they are 'stuck' with us for the first year. But, if our product is not tested well and does not engage in continuous improvement, students will switch to apartments, as soon as they are able. Something that is not in the reading that may be very relevant to housing is the number of people working on projects and taking feedback seriously. The Model T had a few people working on it, and they had clear goals of producing an affordable automobile for the masses that would be nimble on the muddy roads of the time. That is why the Model T has independent suspension. The infamous colossal failure, the Edsel, had a large committee working on it, they did not have a clear vision for their product (but they had a good imagination of the dollar signs they wanted to make), there was testing but that feedback did not get taken seriously because multiple designers wanted to create what they wanted, and the hype leading to its launch meant that the product went to market before it was ready, with trunks sticking and other malfunctions. Committee size is often critical to accomplishing goals. If there are too many people working on something and everybody's ideas get incorporated into a project rather than choosing what might work best and the end result might be messy.Too often I hear stories of students complaining about noise and other people problems on floors leading to them not having good experiences over time because they believe their feedback went ignored.
by K. Shelton, Northern Illinois University
Wednesday, July 19, 2017
Chapter 1 Question 4 3 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University That comes from fear. Unfortunately, I did not come pre-programmed for fear so I am usually the one in trouble for being one of the 'originals.'For students, I do try to help them understand that taking risks means being ready for consequences, and with unknown outcomes, those consequences could be good or bad.
by K. Shelton, Northern Illinois University
Monday, July 17, 2017
Chapter 1 Question 3 5 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University I think this needs to start with staff, and knowing that people with different ideas just might have something valuable to bring to the table. What good does it do to support students if their ideas are just going to get shot down when presented to staff later? If there are too many, "that's the way we always do it" staff members around, then they need to be reminded that new ideas could be good first.
by K. Shelton, Northern Illinois University
Monday, July 17, 2017
Chapter 1 Question 1 3 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University College students who are struggling (and those working minimum-wage jobs) often have the least amount of time to change the system. Thinking about what could be better is really a luxury of time that they do not have and if students do not have time to plan out a strategy to change the system, then change will simply not happen. Their focus and time are spent on surviving, by trying to figure out how to pay day-to-day bills. Those of us who are not already stuck on a hamster wheel and/or treading water should try to be advocates for our students. A good example is the ACA and the ramifications for our students who have jobs. In the past, students could work full-time hours during the summers and save up something to spend on college in the fall. After employers cut back on hiring full-time hours because they do not want to offer health insurance, instead of having one full-time summer job, students now try to balance two or three jobs at 15 to 20 hours each during the summers. They certainly do not have the time to call their representatives about really anything.
by K. Shelton, Northern Illinois University
Monday, July 17, 2017
Open Forum 0 A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University Feel free to post here if other thoughts or questions come up during your reading.
by A. Baker, Case Western Reserve University
Wednesday, July 5, 2017